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Pilot Automac Mechanical Pencil - 0.5 mm - Black Body

$49.50

Pilot Automac Mechanical Pencil - 0.5 mm - Black Body - PILOT HAT-3SR-B
  • Pilot Automac Mechanical Pencil - 0.5 mm - Black Body - PILOT HAT-3SR-B
  • Pilot Automac Mechanical Pencil - 0.5 mm - Black Body - PILOT HAT-3SR-B
  • Pilot Automac Mechanical Pencil - 0.5 mm - Black Body - PILOT HAT-3SR-B
  • Pilot Automac Mechanical Pencil - 0.5 mm - Black Body - PILOT HAT-3SR-B
  • Pilot Automac Mechanical Pencil - 0.5 mm - Black Body - PILOT HAT-3SR-B
  • Pilot Automac Mechanical Pencil - 0.5 mm - Black Body - PILOT HAT-3SR-B
  • Pilot Automac Mechanical Pencil - 0.5 mm - Black Body - PILOT HAT-3SR-B
  • Pilot Automac Mechanical Pencil - 0.5 mm - Black Body - PILOT HAT-3SR-B
  • Pilot Automac Mechanical Pencil - 0.5 mm - Black Body - PILOT HAT-3SR-B
  • Pilot Automac Mechanical Pencil - 0.5 mm - Black Body - PILOT HAT-3SR-B
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The Pilot Automac mechanical pencil features a revolutionary design that never requires you to click a button when you need to extend lead! When the lead first comes out with your initial click, you can keep writing until you reach the end of the lead piece without pressing the top pencil button again. The top knock button also covers an included eraser, and extends the retractable lead sleeve, ensuring protection for the sleeve when not in use. The all metal pencil body has a good weight in hand, and uniquely ridged grip area for writing comfort. Available in different body colors.

Pencil dimensions: Approximately 5.6 inches (14.3 cm) long, and 0.3 inches (9 mm) in diameter.




Specs
Model NumberPILOT HAT-3SR-B
Shipping Weight1.35 oz
Body Color Black
Body Material Plastic
Clip Material Metal
Clippable Yes
Design Style Auto-Feed, Executive
Diameter - Grip 9.3 mm
Diameter - Max 9.8 mm
Eraser Included Yes
Grip Color Silver
Grip Material Metal
Knurled Finger Grip No
Lead Diameter 0.5 mm
Lead Grade Indicator No
Lead Sleeve Length 2.4 mm
Lead Type Graphite Lead
Length - Body 14.4 cm
Length - Retracted 14.2 cm
Mechanism Automatic
Tip Material Metal
Tip Replaceable No

Reviews
7 people found this helpful
  Well, all you people..., July 6, 2012
By jas... - See all my reviews
Well, all you people that keep buying this thing and making it go out of stock in one day could at least leave a review, couldn't you? Guess I'll do my own, after 4 attempts at getting one of these.

I was really interested in this pencil due to the fact that I love to use 4B lead, and it's rather annoying to have to keep clicking the feeder between every sentence or partial drawing.

While the Automac does a great job of automatically advancing the lead, it is a little weird how it does it, and I'm not sure exactly how it works, and I'm not quite sure if I like it yet or not. Based on my observations, while continuing to write when the lead is almost gone, the lead sleeve will slightly back off of the lead, to allow you to continue to write, and then as you lift up on the pencil, it will advance the lead, however, it is just barely out of the lead sleeve.

This causes a little bit of a strange writing feel, in that if you don't advance the lead yourself, you are always writing with the lead just barely sticking out of the lead sleeve. Sometimes this can cause the lead to not mark as dark of a line as you'd like, depending on the angle at which you hold the tip. If you are really slanted, when you write, this will be more of an issue, however, if you write almost vertically, it won't be an issue at all. I played around with it, and am satisfied with the movement of the lead when auto advancing. It's just something to be informed about.

As far as quality, it is a well designed and manufactured piece. At first, I thought the black portion was metal, but when I got it, I thought it was plastic, until I took it apart to inspect it. It appears to be made out of brass, and then painted with some type of really hard enamel paint. It is really glossy, and has a kind of sparkle to it, which is cool. The grip is also interesting, it is not aggressive like some others I've used, but still has enough of a grip to be useful, frankly, it almost feels soft, even though it's made out of metal, quite a different feeling than expected.

I also did not know that the tip is retractable, like a ball point pen, not just allowing the sleeve to slide back in, it's like the vanishing point pencils, which is really nice. Click gently to advance the lead, click more firmly, and it retracts the tip and a significant amount of extended lead back into the body. Pretty nice bonus.

The clip is really firm, a little more firm than I'd like, but it may keep you from losing it, if you actually put this in your shirt pocket. I put mine in my messenger bag pen slot, and it's somewhat difficult to get in the pocket, clipped in, at least.

I'm really happy about this purchase, and it will probably be my go-to pencil for a long time.
4 people found this helpful
  I really want to love..., October 30, 2012
I really want to love this pencil. I carry this and a TWSBI Vac700 fountain pen. My main reason for carrying a pencil at all is for occasions when I might need to erase something I have written, otherwise I use the fountain pen. The problem is that anytime you use the eraser you end up inadvertently advancing the lead. You have to be very conscious of the amount of force you are placing on the eraser to prevent this, sometimes resulting in poor erasing. I have literally had a centimeter or two of lead sticking out in some circumstances after looking at the lead after erasing something.

The lead is advanced by a sleeve that is pushed when the lead gets low enough. However it is also advanced anytime extend or retract the tip. So if you find yourself clicking the back of the pencil to extend the tip only to write a line or two, you will essentially advanced the lead three times, once for the initial extension of the tip, once for the retraction, and a final time for the next time you advance the tip to write.

Between the eraser issues and the lead advancement on clicking the back of the pen, I find myself snapping off a lot of lead, which can get expensive if you use good lead.

All that said I still love the way this pencil feels in my hand. It has a great weight to it, is well balanced, and has a fantastic grip on it. Based on the inevitable lead breakage, I have to dock it a point thought and give it a 4/5.

If there is ever a pencil that has this build quality, with tip advancement like this minus the lead advancement issue, and with the kuru-toga engine, I'll give it a try instead. Until then I guess I'll just keep dropping more money on excess lead.
1 person found this helpful
  The lead sleeve has to..., February 5, 2013
By arthurlien - See all my reviews
The lead sleeve has to come into contact with the paper in order to advance the lead, and then only a very small bit of lead is advanced. Otherwise it's a nice looking pen with a solid feel, but of little use to me.
  When I was in college..., December 31, 2013
By tbu... - See all my reviews
When I was in college there were two mechanical pencils that all the engineering geeks wanted: the ubiquitous Pentel P205 (in blue) and the Pilot H1005. The former because they were so simple and never failed; the latter because the whole front of the pencil disappeared into the barrel making it "pocket safe." Alas, they were plastic and the temptation to put it in one's jeans pocket was too great, which usually resulted in the pencil breaking when you next sat down right where the barrel and the body threaded together. (I still have one in broken condition; couldn't bear to throw it out and still can't after almost 30-years.)

Advance to the present and the 1005 is no longer offered, but a similar pencil is now available in an all metal design: the Pilot Automac. This is a wonderful pencil that feels good in the hand, writes well and retracts fully. The "Automac" feature is an added bonus that, because of years of habit using the standard top-knock pencil, I never really use. The grip is "grippy" but not hard on the hand as some metal knurled pens and pencils can be. The pencil is heavy but balanced, and thin but not "skinny." Overall it's a good writer.

The pencil is made almost completely of metal parts. The internal barrel and the driving mechanism are all shiny metal except for the part that retracts and extends the business end which is white plastic (probably nylon) slipped onto the inside barrel and a matching part is pressed into the outer barrel. It appears to be the typical ball-point pen assembly we're all so familiar with. The external parts are also metal: a black enameled body and a barrel that I think is polished aluminum.

I've never had a fully automatic feed pencil before so I was looking forward to trying it out and find that my experience is the same as some of the other reviewers. The sleeve must rub the paper for it to work and this can cause the line/writing to be lighter though it picks up again when one lifts the pencil between lines/words. The mechanism works by the sleeve sliding up as the lead wears down, and then the lead and the sleeve spring down together when the pencil is lifted. The feel of the sleeve rubbing on the paper is a little hard to get used to after years of writing with mechanical pencils; it's hard to resist giving the pencil a knock when the sleeves starts scratching. Because of all this I don't use the feature that much, and if it weren't for the stellar nature of the pencil I might be disappointed. But it is such a good "mech" that I find that I really want it in my pocket along side my fountain pen.

The eraser is a bit small; I typically don't do that much erasing but when I do I usually have a stick eraser handy. For a letter or two it's OK but as with most mechanical pencils it won't do for much more than that. The knock mechanism is a bit light, so exuberant erasing will extend the lead.

As with most mechanicals, about a fifth of the lead is unusable when it wears down to near the end. You can advance the next lead behind it and use a bit more but it becomes more trouble that it's worth, especially if you are trying to keep up with someone.

Overall I like the pencil and give it high marks; it's hard to find a really good pencil that's metal so I feel the price is justified, the automatic feed feature not withstanding. I'm glad to have finally found a mechanical pencil that is what the 1005 was not.
  I returned the first..., May 3, 2013
By bblock - See all my reviews
I returned the first automac because it stopped advancing the lead. The second unit worked for a little longer but again stopped advancing the lead. Unfortunately it lasted long enough to prevent a refund rather than a store credit. Was a great pencil when it worked, but turned out to be an expensive mistake.
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