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Reviews Written by cathubb

May 23, 2014
This ink is the darkest...
This ink is the darkest of the Diamine browns and also the most lightfast in my tests. It is readily moved around on sized paper with water, so it is great for drawing. The color is lovely, a deep mahogany brown, ranging to nearly black when heavier. I always have it along for writing and drawing. I like its mobility with water, but if you want a water-risistant ink, this should not be your choice.

I like it the best of any of the Diamine browns, and it is deeper and more lightfast than any of the others.

1 person found this helpful
 
September 20, 2013
This is a terrific little...
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This is a terrific little pencil sharpener, especially nice for sketching on the go. The shavings are neatly held inside the chamber, which is easily emptied by squeezing the "fish tail" end. The spring is just the right tension, and I usually don't bother with the little lock. After several months of use, still no problems, including any issue with off-center sharpening. Everything is accessible, a great design. At this price, get several and give them to friends.

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June 27, 2013
LIGHTFAST and water-soluble...
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LIGHTFAST and water-soluble - great for drawing. Most fountain pen inks (except the water-insoluble pigment ones like the Noodler's bulletproof ones, Sailor Nano inks, and Platinum Carbon Black) fade quickly and/or shift color AND fade in the light. This one doesn't, at least in my tests which are currently going on 5 months in a sunny window vs. a control in a drawer. This has been previouisly been noted for Diamine Gray by other people on the web, along with J. Herbin Gris Nuage, which is a lovely ethereal light blue-gray which also appears to be lightfast. In my own tests, Diamine Jet Black (but not over a dozen other water-soluble blacks I have tested) is also lightfast - 4 months and counting in my sunny window. All good additions to your drawing kit. (I have other suggests for a few colored inks that are pretty lightfast and good for drawing, but that doesn't go here.)

This ink behaves well in a fountain pen too. NOT good for signing checks - too soluble - but WONDERFUL for drawing.

1 person found this helpful
 
June 27, 2013
This black is absolutely...
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This black is absolutely terrific for drawing, the best choice I have found for water-soluble black ink that can be lifted and moved with water. Unlike about a dozen of the other fountain pen blacks I have tried (not counting the water-INsoluble ones here), this ink is remarkably lightfast (4 months in a sunny window and counting). (Two other very nice and similarly pretty darned lightfast ones are not truly black - De Atramentis Night Black, which is actually a very dark green, and Diamine Eclipse, which is actually a very dark violet -- I have and enjoy these too.) The other blacks I have tried fade much more quickly, often turning brown first. This includes Aurora, Pelikan, Private Reserve Velvet Black, the other Diamine blacks, J Herbin Perle Noir, and a number of others.

The Diamine Jet Black is a true black, a bit on the cool side, and is completely water-soluble. I have some loaded into a fine Aquash waterbrush and some loaded into a Pilot Petit1 pen converted to an eyedropper. Add a big waterbrush with water or a watercolor brush or two and a vessel of some kind to contain water, and you have part of a great traveling drawing kit. I would add a water-INSOLUBLE black, either a fountain pen ink (Noodler's, Sailor, or Platinum) or a permanent marker (like a Faber-Castell calligraphy marker, for its nice variable line width), so that you can have both permanent and movable black inks.

I've been looking for a reasonably lightfast (like I said, four months and counting in a sunny window) completely water-soluble black ink for drawing, and I have finally found it. It also behaves well in a fountain pen and comes in Diamine's generously-sized 80 ml bottle. Bliss!

1 person found this helpful
 
June 1, 2013
I have both the green...
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I have both the green (55 degree bended nib) and the blue (40 degree) versions of this pen and really enjoy them both. I use the Sailor nano black waterproof ink and it works well. With a tilt of the pen, the line can go to very fine to broad and back, so very good for drawing, like carrying two pens at once except even more convenient since you don't have to keep switching them. The large cartridge chamber actually holds TWO cartridges, one in use and a spare, so the pen is extra-good for traveling. In my experience, the pens start right up even after sitting for a couple of weeks, so nib dry-out isn't an issue as it is with so many pens.

I like both the green (55 degree) and the blue (40 degree) versions of this pen, but I lean slightly to using the blue more often. I've read comments by other artists who lean the other way, toward the green one. You would need to try both and see for yourself.

In any case, if you like to sketch on the go, grab one of these and some nano black cartridges (or your own preference) and a good journal (like Stillman and Birn zeta or beta seeries) and have yourself some fun. If you use a waterproof ink like the nano black, you can add watercolors later.

5 people found this helpful
 
April 1, 2013
Disappearing ink! This...
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Disappearing ink!
This pen writes very nicely and appears to be well designed except for one killer flaw: the ink is extremely light-sensitive. As part of a lightfastness test, I tried out a range of inks and writing pens, including this one, on strips of paper. One test strip went into a window that receives several hours of sun on sunny days. A duplicate went into a closed drawer.

I was shocked when I peeked a week later, not expecting any changes so early. None of the other samples had faded yet, but the sample of writing from this pen was ALMOST GONE. After another week, it had entirely disappeared! (The duplicate sample in the dark drawer had not changed.) Meanwhile, my other standard writing pens, also with black or brown dye-based inks, had not faded noticeably.

Now, this is early March in New England,not known for its powerful sun exposure anyway, and there were at least as many cloudy days as sunny ones. That ink disappeared faster than any I have ever seen. I would assume that even in a normally lit room it would fade so much that documents left out on a desktop would fade within a week or two. This is not acceptable. The people at Pilot know what dyes are in its inks and knows that this ink is extremely fugitive, much more than other dye-based inks. Shame on them!

2 people found this helpful
 
March 23, 2013
I heard about this pen...
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I heard about this pen from a professional artist who uses it constantly for sketching. So I purchased one here (where else?) to see how it compares with a brush pen or a waterbrush.

Now I see what the fuss is about! With a minimal turn of the wrist, you can transition from drawing a fine line to drawing a very thick line that looked almost 3 mm thick. The Sailor nano black ink is lightfast and waterproof, so you can wash over the lines with colors if you want. The Sailor cartridge is fairly capacious, more so than the tiny international ones, or a converter could be used for bottled ink. The cartridge makes a lot of sense for traveling around.

The unusual length of the barrel is not only comfortable in the hand, but it hides a nifty secret: you can put a spare cartridge in there behind the one in use. In fact, the pen comes with two cartridges (I assume not the nano black) in it. Can you say road trip convenience?

I don't write in Asian characters, so I can't say how this pen works for those - sounds pretty popular - but it is both fun and practical for drawing.

3 people found this helpful
 
April 17, 2012
I tried out the Sepia...
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I tried out the Sepia and the Umbra inks in this line and was very pleased with both. When used with dip pen or brush on drawing paper, both inks were highly pigmented, waterproof even when highly diluted with water (given plenty of time to dry and set thoroughly), and much more fluid than the Daler-Rowney FW acrylic inks. This means they were easier to use. Also, the colors of these two inks were superior; the Umbra is a true, deep burnt-umber color that does not shift to yellowish shades upon dilution as the FW browns do. The Sepia is what it should be too, a black-brown that is very similar to watercolor versions. (Again, the FW ink version isn't really a sepia color and turns yellowish when diluted.)

I highly recommend at least these two inks from this line - I'll be saving my nickels for others, because I expect them to be equally fine. I've not seen them for sale in the US anywhere else, so I thank JetPens for carrying them.

2 people found this helpful