Product Reviews Written by betolung

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This is my favorite colored...
February 17, 2015
Verified Purchase
This is my favorite colored lead for doodling and sketching notes in my cartooning classes. The violet is vibrant and easy to see, and the 0.7 mm lead is the most break-resistant from all the colored leads that I have tried. It is erasable. The lead is not lightfast, so I use it mainly in sketchbook journals rather than pieces that will be on display constantly. The violet lead wears down quickly, so keep an eye on how many spare leads you have left in your tube or order them in pairs.
All my comments from...
February 17, 2015
Verified Purchase
All my comments from the broad size nib pen review apply to this one as well. Yet this is the one to choose if you are working on larger scale papers like 9"X12" or 11"X14". It produces a nice bold stroke for caricatures, cartoon portraits, and graphic design pieces. Its pigmented black ink dries waterproof quickly, so it plays nice with watercolors and other water-based coloring media.
Now since I really like...
February 10, 2015
Verified Purchase
Now since I really like using Sakura Pigma Sensei and Micron pens, I was pretty sure that I would love these Sakura Kakikata Felt Tip Pens even before I got them. They are just a tad more slender than my usual pigment pens, and the most effective way to tell the nib sizes apart is by the color coding of their pen caps. You can get some line width variation by tilting the conical bullet nib on the paper. Its pigmented black ink flows smoothly from the juicy nib, and the pen is quite suitable for quick sketching and inking tasks. I tested them during my cartoon drawing class, and found them pretty responsive and reliable. The pigment black ink did not bleed through the paper and dried waterproof pretty quickly. I used the broad nib pen for making name tents with bubble letters for each student, and none of them smeared or bled into the light color areas when they colored them with markers and water-based paints. Used a few watercolor markers to test the water resistance of the Kakikata pens on card stock. For all intents and purposes, all four pens nib sizes dried fast and were fairly waterproof. Just noticed very faint smudging with the extra broad nib strokes. The fresh ink drawings made with the Kakikata pens can be promptly colored with artist watercolors applied with a waterbrush without any noticeable smudges.
If you like drawing with black markers and plan to color them with water media, you should definitely try these drawing pens. I plan to stock up on them once I figure out how long my initial set lasts. Highly recommended.
Looks like the Platinum...
January 31, 2015
Verified Purchase
Looks like the Platinum Preppy 05 M nib Fountain Pen design has been updated a bit since I first reviewed it over a year ago. There have been some changes to the barrel graphics and the feed color. The extra fine 02 nib pen looks completely different with a different font type and more sections of its translucent body painted silver. The nib size is clearly marked on the nib, pen cap, and barrel for easy identification. The "Made in Japan" is more prominently displayed on the new barrels. The Preppy is a pretty easy to use beginner's pen. You just unscrew the barrel, plug the ink cartridge, couple of shakes, wait a couple of minutes for ink to flow into the nib, and it is ready for writing or drawing duties. I tested them first on smooth white card stock while waiting in the ER. I used them with the caps posted on the back of the pen barrel for an optimal balance and more comfortable feel. They all worked smoothly and produced consistent lines without having to put much pressure on the paper surface. The cartridge ink does look a bit lighter than my preferred black Platinum Carbon ink. I have shared these pens with the students in my Art Immersion class (10-14 year old), and they all found them to be smooth drawing tools. At their value price point, it is pretty affordable to get all three Platinum Preppy nib sizes and different ink colors for beginners that want to try fountain pens for the first time without having to make a large investment. They are one of the more cost-effective ways of determining which nib size suits your writing or drawing style best before upgrading to mid-priced pens.Other than the few cosmetic changes already mentioned, the Preppy remains a pretty fuss-free pen. I know you are supposed to flush and clean your pens to prevent clogging, but I never had to with my old one (05 Medium nib). I just simply keep reloading it with black carbon ink and it keeps chugging along fine. I will have to see what happens with the finer nib sizes (02 and 03) after I use up their cartridges. I think I might try reloading the empty cartridges with carbon ink using a syringe.
1 person found this helpful
Looks like the Platinum...
January 31, 2015
Verified Purchase
Looks like the Platinum Preppy 05 M nib Fountain Pen design has been updated a bit since I first reviewed it over a year ago. There have been some changes to the barrel graphics and the feed color. The extra fine 02 nib pen looks completely different with a different font type and more sections of its translucent body painted silver. The nib size is clearly marked on the nib, pen cap, and barrel for easy identification. The "Made in Japan" is more prominently displayed on the new barrels. The Preppy is a pretty easy to use beginner's pen. You just unscrew the barrel, plug the ink cartridge, couple of shakes, wait a couple of minutes for ink to flow into the nib, and it is ready for writing or drawing duties. I tested them first on smooth white card stock while waiting in the ER. I used them with the caps posted on the back of the pen barrel for an optimal balance and more comfortable feel. They all worked smoothly and produced consistent lines without having to put much pressure on the paper surface. The cartridge ink does look a bit lighter than my preferred black Platinum Carbon ink. I have shared these pens with the students in my Art Immersion class (10-14 year old), and they all found them to be smooth drawing tools. At their value price point, it is pretty affordable to get all three Platinum Preppy nib sizes and different ink colors for beginners that want to try fountain pens for the first time without having to make a large investment. They are one of the more cost-effective ways of determining which nib size suits your writing or drawing style best before upgrading to mid-priced pens.Other than the few cosmetic changes already mentioned, the Preppy remains a pretty fuss-free pen. I know you are supposed to flush and clean your pens to prevent clogging, but I never had to with my old one (05 Medium nib). I just simply keep reloading it with black carbon ink and it keeps chugging along fine. I will have to see what happens with the finer nib sizes (02 and 03) after I use up their cartridges. I think I might try reloading the empty cartridges with carbon ink using a syringe.
Looks like the Platinum...
January 31, 2015
Verified Purchase
Looks like the Platinum Preppy 05 M nib Fountain Pen design has been updated a bit since I first reviewed it over a year ago. There have been some changes to the barrel graphics and the feed color. The extra fine 02 nib pen looks completely different with a different font type and more sections of its translucent body painted silver. The nib size is clearly marked on the nib, pen cap, and barrel for easy identification. The "Made in Japan" is more prominently displayed on the new barrels. The Preppy is a pretty easy to use beginner's pen. You just unscrew the barrel, plug the ink cartridge, couple of shakes, wait a couple of minutes for ink to flow into the nib, and it is ready for writing or drawing duties. I tested them first on smooth white card stock while waiting in the ER. I used them with the caps posted on the back of the pen barrel for an optimal balance and more comfortable feel. They all worked smoothly and produced consistent lines without having to put much pressure on the paper surface. The cartridge ink does look a bit lighter than my preferred black Platinum Carbon ink. I have shared these pens with the students in my Art Immersion class (10-14 year old), and they all found them to be smooth drawing tools. At their value price point, it is pretty affordable to get all three Platinum Preppy nib sizes and different ink colors for beginners that want to try fountain pens for the first time without having to make a large investment. They are one of the more cost-effective ways of determining which nib size suits your writing or drawing style best before upgrading to mid-priced pens.Other than the few cosmetic changes already mentioned, the Preppy remains a pretty fuss-free pen. I know you are supposed to flush and clean your pens to prevent clogging, but I never had to with my old one (05 Medium nib). I just simply keep reloading it with black carbon ink and it keeps chugging along fine. I will have to see what happens with the finer nib sizes (02 and 03) after I use up their cartridges. I think I might try reloading the empty cartridges with carbon ink using a syringe.
Besides liking its color...
January 31, 2015
Verified Purchase
Besides liking its color combination, I was drawn to this pen case by its compact design and stitched canvas construction. The outer pocket extends to both sides of the case, so its wide enough to hold 5 capped fountains pens within easy reach. It has a pretty good carrying capacity for having such a slender body, and it could comfortably hold 10 fountain and brush pens within. Its interior has a plastic coating for protection against spills I presume, and its zipper opens pretty wide for easy access to all its contents. With its contemporary good looks and practical features, this pen case would make a perfect choice for carrying your favorite sketching tools everyday.
1 person found this helpful
This flexible piece of...
January 31, 2015
Verified Purchase
This flexible piece of plastic that you slip under your drawing paper to provide cushioning and protect the pages below can easily be kept within the pages of your favorite A4 sketchbook. The 5 mm grid could come in handy if your paper is translucent, and ruler markings are printed in cm on two edges. This would be a good accessory for an A4 sketchbook, for it provides a smooth drawing surface and prevents damage to underlying pages. I would recommend trying one if you are particularly heavy-handed when you draw and tend to make dents on the sheets of paper below.
Tombow Mono 100 is the...
December 25, 2014
Verified Purchase
Tombow Mono 100 is the highest graphite pencil line from one of the two legendary premium Japanese pencil brands (the other would be Mitsubishi Hi-Uni), and it's packaged accordingly in an outstanding plastic case with a hinged lid. The pencils themselves feature a thick black varnish coat with the unique white vertical stripe on its endcap. In my experience, Tombow pencil leads tend to be slightly darker and Mitsubishi leads tends to be a bit more smudge-resistant for the same graphite grade. Yet both premium brands feature superior graphite leads that glide smoothly on the paper surface without a hint of scratchiness. "F" grade pencils have the darkness of "HB" pencils with the strength and point retention of "H" pencils. Thus they are a natural choice for writing and taking notes. I like sketching with "F" pencils, because I find that I do not have to sharpen them as often as softer grades. Their sharp points last longer without breaking. Cheap pencil points often break and crumble under pressure or write very faintly. An artist pencil should have perfectly centered leads, sharpen well, resist breakage, feature consistent darkness for its graphite grade, and glide effortlessly on most papers. I do not my want my creative process to be interrupted by a poor quality lead that breaks for no reason, crumble under pressure, or pencil points that frustratingly keep breaking when trying to sharpen them. If you like to draw with the very best tools available, you should certainly experience the performance of the Tombow Mono 100 pencils in your preferred grades.
Well designed futuristic-looki...
October 28, 2014
Verified Purchase
Well designed futuristic-looking pencil sharpener that yields a nice sharp point or a blunt tip on regular size pencils with a turn of the indicator button. The clear waste receptacle locks securely with a twist to the ratchet mechanism, so the pencil shavings will not fall out by accident. While slightly larger than I expected, it is still fairly compact for a field sketching kit. I noticed that the lid features an hexagonal hole, so you could tie it with a lanyard if you wish to hang it within reach in your studio. Cool accessory for pencil users.
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