Product Reviews Written by betolung

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Now since I really like...
March 10, 2015
Verified Purchase
Now since I really like using Sakura Pigma Sensei and Micron pens, I was pretty sure that I would love these Sakura Kakikata Felt Tip Pens even before I got them. They are just a tad more slender than my usual pigment pens, and the most effective way to tell the nib sizes apart is by the color coding of their pen caps. You can get some line width variation by tilting the conical bullet nib on the paper. Its pigmented black ink flows smoothly from the juicy nib, and the pen is quite suitable for quick sketching and inking tasks. I tested them during my cartoon drawing class, and found them pretty responsive and reliable. The pigment black ink did not bleed through the paper and dried waterproof pretty quickly. I used the broad nib pen for making name tents with bubble letters for each student, and none of them smeared or bled into the light color areas when they colored them with markers and water-based paints. Used a few watercolor markers to test the water resistance of the Kakikata pens on card stock. For all intents and purposes, all four pens nib sizes dried fast and were fairly waterproof. Just noticed very faint smudging with the extra broad nib strokes. The fresh ink drawings made with the Kakikata pens can be promptly colored with artist watercolors applied with a waterbrush without any noticeable smudges.
If you like drawing with black markers and plan to color them with water media, you should definitely try these drawing pens. I plan to stock up on them once I figure out how long my initial set lasts. Highly recommended.
So what do you get for...
March 10, 2015
Verified Purchase
So what do you get for the artist that has everything? Simple answer: a really nice E+M Extension Maximo Artbox Zebrano Pencil Holder that I have been eyeing for some time. Made in Germany. Most artists' first choice of sketching and drawing tool is the humble graphite pencil. As they get shorter with use, pencil stubs can be difficult to hold and sharpen further. If you invest in premium pencils, you would also want to effectively use most of their graphite lead. When a wooden pencil's length gets under 3" or 4" from sharpening it, your grip and control over your mark-making gets compromised. A good pencil holder can securely grip your pencil stubs and give you back those missing inches of barrel length for a comfortable and balanced feeling in your hand while drawing and sketching. The variegated zebrano wood gives this extender a distinct and elegant look that sets it apart from your average pencil extender. Given the natural variability of the light and dark streak patterns in the source wood, I expect that no two holder barrels are exactly alike. Thus if having a unique sketching tool appeals to your sense of individuality, this might just be the right pencil holder for you. From experience, I have found that the extenders with metal screw-style collars have a more reliable grip on the pencils than the classic sliding ring and clutch style peanpole extenders. While it might not have all the functionality of its Staedtler counterpart, the Extension Maximo Artbox pencil holder makes a bold statement on a well-equipped elegant desk or contemporary drafting board. Just make sure to place it in a proper ledge or tray since it is bound to roll away on inclined surfaces. The E+M Extension Maximo Artbox Zebrano Pencil Holder is a great looking pencil accessory that I would recommend for studio use exclusively, for it is much too precious to risk losing it on a sketchcrawl or field trip. I am quite confident that the special artists in your gift list would treasure it for years to come.
I like that the Cubix...
March 4, 2015
Verified Purchase
I like that the Cubix pen case opens flat and that its loops and pockets keep everything neatly organized. If you carry just a handful of tools in single layers, they are all easy to spot and use anywhere on the go. The case sides are two layers of nylon stitched together and offer some cushioning for the protection of your sketching pens. The Cubix case securely holds all its contents within a large zippered chamber or its front zippered pocket, no chance of items falling off. If you like to haul your entire collection of favorite pens to the field, you should know that you can easily stuff up to 15 assorted pens within (even the full length Platinum Carbon Desk fountain pen fits inside). Even at full capacity, it remains fairly slim when viewed from the side. Once securely closed, I shook it vigorously and everything inside pretty much remained in place. With its compact dimensions, it easily fits in any sketching bag or purse. I have been hauling it and tossing it around fully loaded in my messenger bag front pocket, and it has kept all my sketching tools within easy reach in the exact same order I left them. Thus it is a pretty a good choice for carrying your basic drawing supplies everywhere and daily use.
1 person found this helpful
This is my favorite colored...
February 17, 2015
Verified Purchase
This is my favorite colored lead for doodling and sketching notes in my cartooning classes. The violet is vibrant and easy to see, and the 0.7 mm lead is the most break-resistant from all the colored leads that I have tried. It is erasable. The lead is not lightfast, so I use it mainly in sketchbook journals rather than pieces that will be on display constantly. The violet lead wears down quickly, so keep an eye on how many spare leads you have left in your tube or order them in pairs.
All my comments from...
February 17, 2015
Verified Purchase
All my comments from the broad size nib pen review apply to this one as well. Yet this is the one to choose if you are working on larger scale papers like 9"X12" or 11"X14". It produces a nice bold stroke for caricatures, cartoon portraits, and graphic design pieces. Its pigmented black ink dries waterproof quickly, so it plays nice with watercolors and other water-based coloring media.
Now since I really like...
February 10, 2015
Verified Purchase
Now since I really like using Sakura Pigma Sensei and Micron pens, I was pretty sure that I would love these Sakura Kakikata Felt Tip Pens even before I got them. They are just a tad more slender than my usual pigment pens, and the most effective way to tell the nib sizes apart is by the color coding of their pen caps. You can get some line width variation by tilting the conical bullet nib on the paper. Its pigmented black ink flows smoothly from the juicy nib, and the pen is quite suitable for quick sketching and inking tasks. I tested them during my cartoon drawing class, and found them pretty responsive and reliable. The pigment black ink did not bleed through the paper and dried waterproof pretty quickly. I used the broad nib pen for making name tents with bubble letters for each student, and none of them smeared or bled into the light color areas when they colored them with markers and water-based paints. Used a few watercolor markers to test the water resistance of the Kakikata pens on card stock. For all intents and purposes, all four pens nib sizes dried fast and were fairly waterproof. Just noticed very faint smudging with the extra broad nib strokes. The fresh ink drawings made with the Kakikata pens can be promptly colored with artist watercolors applied with a waterbrush without any noticeable smudges.
If you like drawing with black markers and plan to color them with water media, you should definitely try these drawing pens. I plan to stock up on them once I figure out how long my initial set lasts. Highly recommended.
Looks like the Platinum...
January 31, 2015
Verified Purchase
Looks like the Platinum Preppy 05 M nib Fountain Pen design has been updated a bit since I first reviewed it over a year ago. There have been some changes to the barrel graphics and the feed color. The extra fine 02 nib pen looks completely different with a different font type and more sections of its translucent body painted silver. The nib size is clearly marked on the nib, pen cap, and barrel for easy identification. The "Made in Japan" is more prominently displayed on the new barrels. The Preppy is a pretty easy to use beginner's pen. You just unscrew the barrel, plug the ink cartridge, couple of shakes, wait a couple of minutes for ink to flow into the nib, and it is ready for writing or drawing duties. I tested them first on smooth white card stock while waiting in the ER. I used them with the caps posted on the back of the pen barrel for an optimal balance and more comfortable feel. They all worked smoothly and produced consistent lines without having to put much pressure on the paper surface. The cartridge ink does look a bit lighter than my preferred black Platinum Carbon ink. I have shared these pens with the students in my Art Immersion class (10-14 year old), and they all found them to be smooth drawing tools. At their value price point, it is pretty affordable to get all three Platinum Preppy nib sizes and different ink colors for beginners that want to try fountain pens for the first time without having to make a large investment. They are one of the more cost-effective ways of determining which nib size suits your writing or drawing style best before upgrading to mid-priced pens.Other than the few cosmetic changes already mentioned, the Preppy remains a pretty fuss-free pen. I know you are supposed to flush and clean your pens to prevent clogging, but I never had to with my old one (05 Medium nib). I just simply keep reloading it with black carbon ink and it keeps chugging along fine. I will have to see what happens with the finer nib sizes (02 and 03) after I use up their cartridges. I think I might try reloading the empty cartridges with carbon ink using a syringe.
1 person found this helpful
Looks like the Platinum...
January 31, 2015
Verified Purchase
Looks like the Platinum Preppy 05 M nib Fountain Pen design has been updated a bit since I first reviewed it over a year ago. There have been some changes to the barrel graphics and the feed color. The extra fine 02 nib pen looks completely different with a different font type and more sections of its translucent body painted silver. The nib size is clearly marked on the nib, pen cap, and barrel for easy identification. The "Made in Japan" is more prominently displayed on the new barrels. The Preppy is a pretty easy to use beginner's pen. You just unscrew the barrel, plug the ink cartridge, couple of shakes, wait a couple of minutes for ink to flow into the nib, and it is ready for writing or drawing duties. I tested them first on smooth white card stock while waiting in the ER. I used them with the caps posted on the back of the pen barrel for an optimal balance and more comfortable feel. They all worked smoothly and produced consistent lines without having to put much pressure on the paper surface. The cartridge ink does look a bit lighter than my preferred black Platinum Carbon ink. I have shared these pens with the students in my Art Immersion class (10-14 year old), and they all found them to be smooth drawing tools. At their value price point, it is pretty affordable to get all three Platinum Preppy nib sizes and different ink colors for beginners that want to try fountain pens for the first time without having to make a large investment. They are one of the more cost-effective ways of determining which nib size suits your writing or drawing style best before upgrading to mid-priced pens.Other than the few cosmetic changes already mentioned, the Preppy remains a pretty fuss-free pen. I know you are supposed to flush and clean your pens to prevent clogging, but I never had to with my old one (05 Medium nib). I just simply keep reloading it with black carbon ink and it keeps chugging along fine. I will have to see what happens with the finer nib sizes (02 and 03) after I use up their cartridges. I think I might try reloading the empty cartridges with carbon ink using a syringe.
Looks like the Platinum...
January 31, 2015
Verified Purchase
Looks like the Platinum Preppy 05 M nib Fountain Pen design has been updated a bit since I first reviewed it over a year ago. There have been some changes to the barrel graphics and the feed color. The extra fine 02 nib pen looks completely different with a different font type and more sections of its translucent body painted silver. The nib size is clearly marked on the nib, pen cap, and barrel for easy identification. The "Made in Japan" is more prominently displayed on the new barrels. The Preppy is a pretty easy to use beginner's pen. You just unscrew the barrel, plug the ink cartridge, couple of shakes, wait a couple of minutes for ink to flow into the nib, and it is ready for writing or drawing duties. I tested them first on smooth white card stock while waiting in the ER. I used them with the caps posted on the back of the pen barrel for an optimal balance and more comfortable feel. They all worked smoothly and produced consistent lines without having to put much pressure on the paper surface. The cartridge ink does look a bit lighter than my preferred black Platinum Carbon ink. I have shared these pens with the students in my Art Immersion class (10-14 year old), and they all found them to be smooth drawing tools. At their value price point, it is pretty affordable to get all three Platinum Preppy nib sizes and different ink colors for beginners that want to try fountain pens for the first time without having to make a large investment. They are one of the more cost-effective ways of determining which nib size suits your writing or drawing style best before upgrading to mid-priced pens.Other than the few cosmetic changes already mentioned, the Preppy remains a pretty fuss-free pen. I know you are supposed to flush and clean your pens to prevent clogging, but I never had to with my old one (05 Medium nib). I just simply keep reloading it with black carbon ink and it keeps chugging along fine. I will have to see what happens with the finer nib sizes (02 and 03) after I use up their cartridges. I think I might try reloading the empty cartridges with carbon ink using a syringe.
1 person found this helpful
Besides liking its color...
January 31, 2015
Verified Purchase
Besides liking its color combination, I was drawn to this pen case by its compact design and stitched canvas construction. The outer pocket extends to both sides of the case, so its wide enough to hold 5 capped fountains pens within easy reach. It has a pretty good carrying capacity for having such a slender body, and it could comfortably hold 10 fountain and brush pens within. Its interior has a plastic coating for protection against spills I presume, and its zipper opens pretty wide for easy access to all its contents. With its contemporary good looks and practical features, this pen case would make a perfect choice for carrying your favorite sketching tools everyday.
1 person found this helpful
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