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Reviews Written by benjamin_chin_88

April 7, 2010
I bought a brown Prera...
I bought a brown Prera then followed by a white Prera.
The brown one shows smudge (from finger grease / perspiration) quite clearly and requires more frequent cleaning to clear the visible smudge prints. It also makes any dust that is on it, appear visible. The darker brown attracts more heat if the pen is left under the Sun, therefore causing more ink evaporation within the pen cap.
The white one does not show the smudge, though they are there. Any dust on the white surface is hardly noticeable. The white surface does not attract as much solar heat.
Verdict : I prefer the white Prera more than the brown one.

1 person found this helpful
 
April 7, 2010
I bought a brown Prera...
I bought a brown Prera then followed by a white Prera.
The brown one shows smudge (from finger grease / perspiration) quite clearly and requires more frequent cleaning to clear the visible smudge prints. It also makes any dust that is on it, appear visible. The darker brown attracts more heat if the pen is left under the Sun, therefore causing more ink evaporation within the pen cap.
The white one does not show the smudge, though they are there. Any dust on the white surface is hardly noticeable. The white surface does not attract as much solar heat.
Verdict : I prefer the white Prera more than the brown one.

3 people found this helpful
 
April 7, 2010
I bought a brown Prera...
I bought a brown Prera then followed by a white Prera.
The brown one shows smudge (from finger grease / perspiration) quite clearly and requires more frequent cleaning to clear the visible smudge prints. It also makes any dust that is on it, appear visible. The darker brown attracts more heat if the pen is left under the Sun, therefore causing more ink evaporation within the pen cap.
The white one does not show the smudge, though they are there. Any dust on the white surface is hardly noticeable. The white surface does not attract as much solar heat.
Verdict : I prefer the white Prera more than the brown one.

1 person found this helpful
 
April 7, 2010
I bought a brown Prera...
I bought a brown Prera then followed by a white Prera.
The brown one shows smudge (from finger grease / perspiration) quite clearly and requires more frequent cleaning to clear the visible smudge prints. It also makes any dust that is on it, appear visible. The darker brown attracts more heat if the pen is left under the Sun, therefore causing more ink evaporation within the pen cap.
The white one does not show the smudge, though they are there. Any dust on the white surface is hardly noticeable. The white surface does not attract as much solar heat.
Verdict : I prefer the white Prera more than the brown one.

 
December 30, 2009
I bought just one piece...
I bought just one piece to try out.

The nib is pelleted at the tip and the writing experience is smooth. Nib is sensitive to provide good ink flow.

My pen comes with a fine point and I noticed that it is wider than the fine point of my Lamy AL-Star fountain pen. I expect Japanese nibs to be one size smaller than European nibs, but this Pilot Petit1 nib proves otherwise.

The original Pilot ink that comes with the pen is smooth flowing but exhibits feathering and a high tendency to bleed through writing paper.

The Pilot ink disappoints me. Any ink that needs good quality paper to perform only presents itself as a restriction to me as I cannot always dictate the quality of paper accessible to me.

I bought six additional cartridges (thus seven cartridges in total) and flushed all those ink away. Instead, I bought a bottle of Platinum ink and an injection syringe to fill those emptied cartridges with better performing Platinum ink.

2 people found this helpful
 
December 30, 2009
I bought just one piece...
I bought just one piece to try out.

The nib is pelleted at the tip and the writing experience is smooth. Nib is sensitive to provide good ink flow.

My pen comes with a fine point and I noticed that it is wider than the fine point of my Lamy AL-Star fountain pen. I expect Japanese nibs to be one size smaller than European nibs, but this Pilot Petit1 nib proves otherwise.

The original Pilot ink that comes with the pen is smooth flowing but exhibits feathering and a high tendency to bleed through writing paper.

The Pilot ink disappoints me. Any ink that needs good quality paper to perform only presents itself as a restriction to me as I cannot always dictate the quality of paper accessible to me.

I bought six additional cartridges (thus seven cartridges in total) and flushed all those ink away. Instead, I bought a bottle of Platinum ink and an injection syringe to fill those emptied cartridges with better performing Platinum ink.

 
December 30, 2009
I bought just one piece...
I bought just one piece to try out.

The nib is pelleted at the tip and the writing experience is smooth. Nib is sensitive to provide good ink flow.

My pen comes with a fine point and I noticed that it is wider than the fine point of my Lamy AL-Star fountain pen. I expect Japanese nibs to be one size smaller than European nibs, but this Pilot Petit1 nib proves otherwise.

The original Pilot ink that comes with the pen is smooth flowing but exhibits feathering and a high tendency to bleed through writing paper.

The Pilot ink disappoints me. Any ink that needs good quality paper to perform only presents itself as a restriction to me as I cannot always dictate the quality of paper accessible to me.

I bought six additional cartridges (thus seven cartridges in total) and flushed all those ink away. Instead, I bought a bottle of Platinum ink and an injection syringe to fill those emptied cartridges with better performing Platinum ink.

 
December 29, 2009
After purchasing the...
After purchasing the Platinum “Preppy” fountain pen, I also bought the Sailor Ink Pen.

Ink flow of the Sailor Ink Pen is good. The problem lies with the very smooth flowing Sailor ink instead (as with other very smooth flowing ink like Aurora). The ink tends to spread into thicker line and also exhibits tendency to bleed through some types of writing paper.

Richard F. Binder wrote in his website that "Inks that flow too well often tend to feather or bleed, especially on cheap papers, and this sort of excessive flow lowers an ink’s score."
Source : http://www.richardspens.com/?page=main.htm

Now I get to see what Richard F. Binder meant by his words above. Ink that flows well is good enough, it does not need to be very smooth flowing.

Since the Sailor (and Aurora) ink needs certain sort of good quality paper, this restricts my application of this ink as I cannot always dictate the quality of paper accessible to me.

The nib is without pellet at the tip. This makes the Sailor Ink Pen “scratchy” on the paper.

The above problems do not happen to the Platinum “Preppy” fountain pen.

The Platinum ink is more water-resistant than Sailor ink and the Platinum ink does not bleed through paper as much as the Sailor ink.

The nib of the Platinum “Preppy” is pelleted to give a smooth writing experience.

An additional spring-loaded cone is inside the pen-cap of the Platinum “Preppy” to provide additional seal to the nib-section. This slows down evaporation of the ink. Intelligent design for even a cheap pen ! No such thought is put into the pen-cap of the Sailor Ink Pen.

Verdict : Platinum “Preppy” and Platinum ink are superior than Sailor Ink Pen and Sailor ink.

4 people found this helpful
 
December 28, 2009
After purchasing the...
After purchasing the Platinum “Preppy” fountain pen, I also bought the Sailor Ink Pen.

Ink flow of the Sailor Ink Pen is good. The problem lies with the very smooth flowing Sailor ink instead (as with other very smooth flowing ink like Aurora). The ink tends to spread into thicker line and also exhibits tendency to bleed through some types of writing paper.

Richard F. Binder wrote in his website that "Inks that flow too well often tend to feather or bleed, especially on cheap papers, and this sort of excessive flow lowers an ink’s score."
Source : http://www.richardspens.com/?page=main.htm

Now I get to see what Richard F. Binder meant by his words above. Ink that flows well is good enough, it does not need to be very smooth flowing.

Since the Sailor (and Aurora) ink needs certain sort of good quality paper, this restricts my application of this ink as I cannot always dictate the quality of paper accessible to me.

The nib is without pellet at the tip. This makes the Sailor Ink Pen “scratchy” on the paper.

The above problems do not happen to the Platinum “Preppy” fountain pen.

The Platinum ink is more water-resistant than Sailor ink and the Platinum ink does not bleed through paper as much as the Sailor ink.

The nib of the Platinum “Preppy” is pelleted to give a smooth writing experience.

An additional spring-loaded cone is inside the pen-cap of the Platinum “Preppy” to provide additional seal to the nib-section. This slows down evaporation of the ink. Intelligent design for even a cheap pen ! No such thought is put into the pen-cap of the Sailor Ink Pen.

Verdict : Platinum “Preppy” and Platinum ink are superior than Sailor Ink Pen and Sailor ink.

 
December 28, 2009
After purchasing the...
After purchasing the Platinum “Preppy” fountain pen, I also bought the Sailor Ink Pen.

Ink flow of the Sailor Ink Pen is good. The problem lies with the very smooth flowing Sailor ink instead (as with other very smooth flowing ink like Aurora). The ink tends to spread into thicker line and also exhibits tendency to bleed through some types of writing paper.

Richard F. Binder wrote in his website that "Inks that flow too well often tend to feather or bleed, especially on cheap papers, and this sort of excessive flow lowers an ink’s score."
Source : http://www.richardspens.com/?page=main.htm

Now I get to see what Richard F. Binder meant by his words above. Ink that flows well is good enough, it does not need to be very smooth flowing.

Since the Sailor (and Aurora) ink needs certain sort of good quality paper, this restricts my application of this ink as I cannot always dictate the quality of paper accessible to me.

The nib is without pellet at the tip. This makes the Sailor Ink Pen “scratchy” on the paper.

The above problems do not happen to the Platinum “Preppy” fountain pen.

The Platinum ink is more water-resistant than Sailor ink and the Platinum ink does not bleed through paper as much as the Sailor ink.

The nib of the Platinum “Preppy” is pelleted to give a smooth writing experience.

An additional spring-loaded cone is inside the pen-cap of the Platinum “Preppy” to provide additional seal to the nib-section. This slows down evaporation of the ink. Intelligent design for even a cheap pen ! No such thought is put into the pen-cap of the Sailor Ink Pen.

Verdict : Platinum “Preppy” and Platinum ink are superior than Sailor Ink Pen and Sailor ink.