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Reviews Written by azureflash

September 23, 2014
See my full review on...
See my full review on the blue variety, but long story short: the form factor makes it awkward to use and difficult to reach the required pressure to erase (pressure = force / area, with a small area you need more force, which this small eraser can't easily take without bending or breaking). You will not erase much less accurately with a good quality block eraser.

 
September 23, 2014
Nearly useless. Not only...
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Nearly useless. Not only is it subject to the same skin oil incompatibility problem as most Pentel erasers, where if you use an eraser shield or brush off the eraser with your fingers it will DRASTICALLY reduce erasing power and produce uneraseable black smudges on the paper, but it also fails in areas where it's supposed to be uniquely suited for.

Its form factor, which is supposed to be its selling point, makes it hard to reach sufficient pressure to erase. When used on the broad side, the eraser folds and the erasing area increases, dissipating and spreading applied force. When used on the thin side or on a corner, you do get better pressure, but the thin side is not very different from using a block eraser's edge, and corners can easily break off. Produces a lot of small, fairly messy clumps. Difficult to handle for big hands like mine. Sleeve slides around very easily, too much so I'd say.

At least Pentel's Light Erase and Dust Gathering, which have the same issues with skin oil, have the redeeming qualities of their unique mechanical properties. My advice is to look at the Kokuyo Campus erasers for your lead grade (B/HB or 2B, I use the B/HB variety with 0.3mm B lead). If you insist on wanting to try using this eraser, here are my tips for best results: place the sleeve VERY close to the erasing end (a couple millimeters), erase with the thin side or a corner by being careful, avoid touching the tip of the eraser (if you do just wipe it off on a piece of scrap paper). If you do that then this becomes a somewhat more precise than average eraser with fairly unremarkable erasing power.

In conclusion I'd say that small form factor erasers are a gimmick. If you are familiar with your block eraser's softness and required pressure to erase, you can erase very precisely. Even better if you have an eraser that starts erasing quickly at a lighter pressure, such as my Kokuyo or Pentel's Light Erase. If you have an exceptional need for the utmost precision, you would be better off looking at electric erasers. I haven't had the chance to try any, but their rotating action completely eliminates travel and I think that's the way to achieve ultimate precision, if that's what you need.

2 people found this helpful
 
September 19, 2014
Rugged and stylish P200-like...
Rugged and stylish P200-like body with clever and fool-proof mechanism that allows you to use a 3mm length of lead per click while protecting it with the sliding lead sleeve. Affordable pencil that brings you the best of both worlds, a thin line with none of the inconvenients typically associated with it.

See my full review of this pencil under the review section for the white color.

 
September 19, 2014
Rugged and stylish P200-like...
Rugged and stylish P200-like body with clever and fool-proof mechanism that allows you to use a 3mm length of lead per click while protecting it with the sliding lead sleeve. Affordable pencil that brings you the best of both worlds, a thin line with none of the inconvenients typically associated with it.

See my full review of this pencil under the review section for the white color.

 
September 19, 2014
Rugged and stylish P200-like...
Rugged and stylish P200-like body with clever and fool-proof mechanism that allows you to use a 3mm length of lead per click while protecting it with the sliding lead sleeve. Affordable pencil that brings you the best of both worlds, a thin line with none of the inconvenients typically associated with it.

See my full review of this pencil under the review section for the white color.

 
September 19, 2014
Rugged and stylish P200-like...
Rugged and stylish P200-like body with clever and fool-proof mechanism that allows you to use a 3mm length of lead per click while protecting it with the sliding lead sleeve. Affordable pencil that brings you the best of both worlds, a thin line with none of the inconvenients typically associated with it.

See my full review of this pencil under the review section for the white color.

 
September 19, 2014
tl;dr: Rugged and stylish...
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tl;dr: Rugged and stylish P200-like body with clever and fool-proof mechanism that allows you to use a 3mm length of lead per click while protecting it with the sliding lead sleeve. Affordable pencil that brings you the best of both worlds, a thin line with none of the inconvenients typically associated with it.
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As of writing this, I've got this pencil clipped to my shirt pocket and I just completed a small series of test with it. As always Pentel puts out a very practical and solid-feeling product that features well-executed innovative ideas.

The first thing you notice about the Orenz is the solid plastic body similar in feel to the P200 series we all know and love. The only differences with the P200 series is that the clip is a little more stylized and rounded, and the tip of the pencil is also tapered and stylized. The ridges are more spaced and less deep than on the P200 series, so while it's not as grippy as the P200's, it's smoother yet not outright slippery because of the type of plastic.

Before really putting the lead support system to any tests, I changed the provided HB lead with some Pentel Ain Stein B lead. I don't know if that HB lead is the same stuff as Pentel Ain Stein, and it might be, but it's worth swapping out the leads just to use a softer grade, since it will produce darker, more visible lines while still not smearing.

It is a bit strange to write without seeing the lead at first. Seeing only the tube, I had a very slight "lag" impression the first time I wrote, but you get used to it in seconds. The important thing is that writing with this is very very smooth. The difference between that and naked 0.35mm lead is pretty much unnoticeable.

The next test I did was to hand it to my dad, an extremely heavy-handed and left-handed writer who is used to blunt wood pencils (!!) and cheap ballpoint pens (!!!!!). He had a breakage or two at first, but he was able to write a whole sentence without it breaking. And the lead sleeve is still intact, which I think is a testament to this system's reliability. It won't just fall apart as soon as you put too much pressure. In fact, upon further testing myself, I found that I can confidently put down pressure I would hesitate to put on a 0.9mm! It's not unbreakable by any means, you can't bang it on a table or anything, but it resists to every stress it could reasonably experience.

Next I tried writing with it until the lead runs out. When it does run out, which takes a while because the system allows you to start writing with a full 3 millimeters of lead extended, it doesn't scratch the paper, it just stops writing, and with a single click you've got the full length of the sleeve full of lead again and ready to write. This system truly does everything it could possibly do to minimize the number of clicks you have to make, which is often a criticism of mechanical pencils with extremely tiny leads.

The way I think it works is that the tip of the pencil contains the free-sliding lead sleeve unit, while the lead extender is exactly 3mm behind the sliding sleeve's furthest position. When you click once, the lead extender kisses the back of the sleeve unit and lets the lead drop down to exactly that 3mm length. Further clicks extend a variable amount of lead, between 0.5mm and 1mm, which is the behavior of a lead extender with nothing in front of it to limit it (like most 2mm lead holders).

When people hear about sub-0.5mm lead, they think it's brittle (which is partly due to their poor choice of lead, I think), and they think they'll have to click out lead after every sentence. This pencil shatters those stereotypes, allowing you to use the same pressure you'd put on a really thick lead, and truly maximizing the writing length per click to a degree most thicker-leaded pencils can only dream of.

This is an extremely appealing and affordable option for small writers or STEM students. It blows everything under its price out of the water with its simple and ingenious mechanism, and it compares well to everything above its price thanks to its timeless rugged plastic P200-like body design.

2 people found this helpful
 
August 6, 2014
INTRODUCTION: I've put...
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INTRODUCTION: I've put this eraser and 9 others (Pentel dust-gathering, light-erasing, black and stein black, Boxy, Pilot Foam, Sakura Foam, Kokuyo B/HB, Kokuyo 2B, Mars Plastic) through a rigorous and extensive series of 8 tests based on my application specifications (0.3mm Pentel Ain Stein B lead with Rhodia paper). The tests were parallel (sustained) erasing, perpendicular (instantaneous) erasing, smudge test (several perpendicular lines), large area erasing, lead-dirty erasing, clumping, finger oil dirty erasing and eraser shield compatibility. Of those tests, the main differences were highlighted in the parallel, smudge, finger oil dirty and eraser shield tests.

REVIEW: This particular eraser, the Kokuyo B/HB, was amongst the best in all test and I found it to be the all-around best performer. Sustained erasing left an evenly and supremely faint line. Instantaneous erasing performance in the smudge test was average, but reliable. Most distinguishing of all, this eraser was utterly unaffected by skin oils and left the crispest, whitest patterns with an eraser shield in a patch of lead-darkened paper.

CONCLUSION: For its extreme reliability and performance which, in my case, surpassed even the venerable Mars Plastic in some cases, I give this eraser the highest ratings as well as my personal recommendation, especially if your operational parameters are similar to mine.

1 person found this helpful
 
February 10, 2014
This pencil delivers...
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This pencil delivers all that's needed in a mechanical pencil, ONLY what's needed, and it takes every little detail to perfection. From tip to cap:

- The lead sleeve is sturdy and perfectly visible at all times;
- In conjunction with Pentel's high quality lead, the precise mechanism and sleeve hold the lead well, do not wobble or shear the lead and allow fine writing with spectacular endurance*;
- The mechanism is not clicky (to my slight disappointment) but it is very tactile and precise;
- The knurled grip completely eliminates slip without being biting or grating**;
- The lead sleeve and grip assembly is replaceable, so this pencil will follow you for life even if you manage to jam it or break the sturdy lead sleeve;
- The hexagonal body is stylish and practical in that it keeps the pencil from rolling;
- The clip is low-profile, bendable yet strong;
- The lead grade indicator has just the right amount of friction so it's easy to set and won't drift away;
- The cap fits between the barrel and the body using a simple yet ingenious little protruding strip of metal that bends when you insert the cap.

I used 0.9mm for over 5 years and decided to take a big plunge into extra-fine writing. I am SO GLAD I did. This pencil, in combination with the lead I chose, Pentel Ain Stein 0.3mm B grade, smoothly creates dark, crisp, smudge-resistant lines. It is truly writing paradise.

*: With 0.8mm of lead extended (two clicks), I apply as much pressure as I used to on 0.9mm and it doesn't even come close to breaking. I had my dad try it, he who is used to writing huge letters in wooden pencils which are practically indestructible in comparison to mechanical pencil lead, and he had no issues at all. I can write very legible text with a full centimeter of lead extended (!!!!!) while most people I know use cheapass 0.5mm lead and a dollar pencil and their leads are exploding constantly. Sucks to be them!

** A little trick for picking up little specks of dust from the grip is to use a soft eraser and just press it against the area where a speck of dust got stuck, without rubbing (rubbing intently with your finger or an eraser will make it worse). The dust will adhere to the eraser and you can keep your grip nice and black. Wipe your eraser and repeat as needed.

 
February 6, 2014
This ruler is ten times...
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This ruler is ten times cuter than the pictures let it seem! It is about 2 centimeters wide when unfolded, which gives it a really sleek and cute profile. The graduations are crisp, and the other side with the zero directly against the edge is GENIUS, no other ruler I can find does this.

The protractor at the hinge is pretty handy. It's not really meant as a measurement tool (error would be almost 10 degrees on any reading), but it helps you draw and eyeball 15deg increment angles in a snap! You'll need good eyeballs and lighting however because the brown angle graduations lack a little contrast. Minus 0.1 out of 5 for such a tiny oversight.

I only wish the hinge would click at every 15 degree increment, which would also mean click into place once fully folded out. I'll only take off 0.2 because of that, though, because this is not really a defect of this product. The protractor already works really well and the hinge feels rock solid.

In summary, this stylish little buddy will fulfill your every need for a ruler. Good for working with common angles, for drawing lines, for measuring at edges, and for feeling like a ninja when you swing it open! Overall rating 4.7/5, gladly rounded up!

4 people found this helpful